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that everything must be on the table including defense which accounts for 20% that you probably know of the budget that the defense doesn't seem to be on the table in terms of lightly discussed solutions or strategies. instead we confront the sequestration, a thoroughly bad idea for getting the defense budget or any other budget unless we take action we could take a fiscal or economic crisis that forces the cuts to the military priorities, steep and arbitrary cuts that are more coherent or prioritized. the question is can we and how do we achieve savings that can improve our fiscal outlook while meeting our national security needs. to quote at arnall mullen again, he said the pentagon budget was basically doubled in the last decade and in doubling the ability to prioritize to make the decisions to deutsch analyses to make trades. we also need a review of the defense strategy that makes sure that we are preparing for the threats and risks of the 21st century, not those of the past. the efforts on the longest lines to help advance the best ideas for improving our defense strategy. earlier this year,
nuclear program. part of an event recently hosted by the foundation for defense of democracy here in washington d.c. this is just over 40 minutes. >> great. thanks very much, david. thank you to all of you. thank you, senator casey. grateful for your remarks and service. we are going to do a topic that is going to sound technical, non-proliferation policy in the wake of the arab spring, but i want to put this to some human terms. this is the sum of all of your panel. i spent the entire night last night time to think of a way to do this and entertaining and humorous way. there is no such a way. this is about weapons of mass destruction in the middle east. it is a serious topic, and we have very serious experts. people who are the leading rights in non-proliferation. joe had the privilege of spending a year working with in a project on the lease nonproliferation, and we're going to have a very detailed report that we will be issuing in january. well over 100 pages already. very specific recommendations on how to deal with this grave threat. we have talked about the iranian nucle
going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they do so in a way that avoids conflict, that avoids miscalculation, that uses the vehicles available today through diplomacy and through those legal forums that allow them to get to reasonable solutions on these w
by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some sophisticated weapons. can we afford to wait a year for the regional solution. >> i think one of the things as we
on military and national defense, number three. increasing taxes on all americans. majority of americans, reducing spending on programs that benefit the poor like medicare and welfare, that's at 51. reducing spending on programs that benefit the elderly like social security and medicare, only at 34. so as you can see again, compromise is an interesting issue. it becomes very, very complicated. so that's a quick snapshot of this survey. [inaudible] ron has done that also. that is coming up, and thank you very much. [applause] >> [inaudible] ♪ ♪ ♪ >> i am 25. this is my third year out of college and i'm on my third job. >> i'm semi-retarded. i've always been a salesman multinational corporations, also a stockbroker. and now i'm selling language programs that is family-owned and run, working a small company is great spent my name is jason. i'm a real estate agent and an investor. >> and i am case manager and also -- spent my name is rod rodriguez. i consider myself leigh keno. born in cuba. when i came to america i was eight years old. really, right now my hobby is my children. >> con
to conference and pass a defense authorization bill. we have time to debate and avoid the fiscal cliff. we have time to address a farm bill and dozens of others -- other important issues, and we have time to address the transcend ant issue of the universal rights of mankind. mr. president, i yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from south dakota. mr. thune: i rise today in strong support of the legislation before us to enact permanent normal trade relations with respect to russia and moldova. this will put in place a new mechanism for combating human rights abuses, commonly known as the magnitsky bill. the economic argument for the legislation before us is clear. russia is the world's sixth largest economy. the world's fifth largest global importer of agricultural products and home to 140 million potential customers, the largest consumer market in europe. russia is already an important and growing market for united states businesses. of the top 15 u.s. trading partners, russia was the market where american companies enjoyed the fastest export growth last year at 38%. if we enact
recently this week in working through a large and complex defense authorization bill that will keep our nation safer and more secure in these perilous times. it will take more of this kind of cooperation and consensus building to address the very real and substantial challenges facing our nation today. that is why i'm deeply concerned about a proposal floated recently by some members of the majority regarding the rules of the senate. they propose to change the nearly 100-year-old senate rule that requires a two-thirds majority to change the operating rules of the senate. our colleagues in the majority are proposing to use a simple majority vote to make the change. that's the issue here. the issue is the manner in which they plan to do it. once the precedent of changing a rule with a simple majority vote is established, 51 senators could change the rules to suit their own convenience. in other words, they want to break the rules in order to change the rules. that would be a big mistake. that would be, as the majority leader himself said in his own book, the death of the senate. votes tha
. >> host: so for 2013, we're talking about a total of $109 billion in cuts. the non-defense part of that, discretionary spending makes up about eight eight billion. -- 38 billion. non-defense mandatory is 16 billion. can you explain the difference? >> guest: the mandatory has to do with entitlement programs that are beneficiaries or committed to receiving by law and discretionary spending is where congress has an annual appropriation and that has a lot more flexibility year to year which to cut and which to raise. >> host: so if this happens, let's just begin with what's not on the table. what is exempted from sequestration when it comes to domestic spending? >> guest: well, there's a list of civilian, military pay, veterans benefits, a lot of the what would be called social welfare programs, like the food stamps or snap program. women, infant children. there's retirement, social security, medicaid is exempt. there is also federal salaries in terms of their general schedule brackets can not be affected. >> host: so there is a lot of cuts that would go through if sequestration happens but
to try to fix these problems on revenues, on social security, on medicare, on spending, on defense. and there are going to be different opinions about how we do it. and the truth is, there are going to be really hard choices, and people are not going to be able to all, um, have everything they want as we work as a country to try to dig ourselves out of a fiscal hole. so i'm actually not at all surprised, um, that people are concerned and worried about the choices as we're just trying to figure them out, but i am disappointed that when people are come anything good faith to try to have a real policy discussion about how to do it, that we're not able to. so that, i think, is going to be the kinds of challenges we have as we try to do what the campaign is doing, which is create a big table where we can have that discussion. i think senator portman was incredibly generous to say he looks forward to meeting with his constituents, and i would now like to invite him -- if you're willing to, senator -- to come up and can talk about some of the policies you wanted to talk about. [applause]
of defense. and i've been somebody, i've supported every penny. i didn't vote for going to war in iraq, thought that was a huge mistake, but i've supported every dollar of spending for our troops in the field. and i can tell you, as a budget committee chairman, we can save more money in defense. and there are lots of republicans who know we can do it, too. mr. president, other mandatory, that's another category the republicans said save $300 billion there. i think they're $100 billion too high because we've already saved over $100 billion out of other mandatory spending in the budget deal we did last year. so let's save $200 billion. that would represent, again, 4% of what we are projected to spend over the next ten years in other mandatory spending. $5.1 trillion is what we're programmed to spend. $200 billion of savings there would represent 4%. again, i've had colleagues tell me, well, we can't possibly save $200 billion. i've had some staff people tell me we can't save $200 billion. so i say, okay, how much are we going to spend? how much are we going to spend? that $200 billion re
it people to work together win. whether it be against complex football defenses, or the problem of modern society, end quote. this is a simple lesson, one we all learned as children. this is what we need to do now. stakes couldn't be higher. more than $7 trillion of tax cuts in medicare payments and programs for unemployed will expire in just 27 days am today. adding to these spending cuts and tax increases or sequestration, cuts of almost 10% of both defense and nondefense, and cuts of 2% medicare. it would be hard to find a single american not affected by these changes. you all know how serious this is. you believe, like me, that we can do it. to prevent fiscal crisis. but the answer is not just extend all of these tax cuts and delight all of these cuts. that is not the answer. this is an opportunity, an opportunity to commit to balance plan, to bring our national debt back down to sustainable levels. the united states, i believe come is at a critical juncture. we can come together, show the world we are still responsible actors. we can prove that america is still the leader of a global
, tax increases for every american taxpayer, massive cuts to defense at a time when the threats around the world are as varied and as great as we've seen in a long time. other essential programs of the federal government being affected by that. that's the last thing we need in this tepid economy with a lot of people out of work and hoping for some consensus to come together to provide a -- a long-term solution to our fiscal problem that continues to have a negative effect on our economy and more importantly, keeps people out of work. and so as that clock ticks, some are saying, well, partisanship is just too great in washington. the country's too divided. we're not going to be able to reach a consensus here in terms of how to address this problem. i disagree with that. over the last two years, and more, we have had a number of proposals brought forward on a bipartisan basis. it started with simpson-bowles, the former chief of staff to president clinton and al for a lon time, recognized asy two individuals that could take a look at the situation that we're in and make a proposal. that's
to the defense settlement and the objective the nhs budget and the object to the education budget, even though nhs schools are going up, and what exactly would they do? the problem is as was evident from the shadow chancellor's response, they didn't have anything to say on these matters but if they had a credible deficit plan then we would listen to the questions they ask us about the priorities of those plans. >> john stephenson. >> this cools and colleges of 270 million are extremely welcome. schools and colleges such as those in my constituency plans on the runway ready to take off, just in a little additional financial support. will the chancellor help those colleges and schools? >> i'm very happy to look personally at the case my honorable friend makes for his local education facility. these are of course other government departments but we have provided the money for education, for new free schools and academies. and i'm sure that carlyle should be looked at. >> steve reed. >> chancellor aware because of his continuing inadequate level of funding to school building which today's statemen
be tracked and updated, and key decisions documented and defensible. finally, with regard to the cost estimate credibility, the rail authority did conduct a sensitivity analysis and an independent cost estimate, but these were limited to the initial construction segments. in addition, it did not conduct risk and uncertainty analysis to determine the likelihood that the estimates would be met. without these steps, decision-makers cannot identify the risks that may affect the projects cost. moving onto my second point, in addition to developing reliable cost estimates, the california high-speed rail project faces many challenges. chief among these is obtaining project funding beyond the initial 130-mile construction segment. while the rail authority has secured 11.5 billion for federal and state sources, it needs at least 57 billion in additional funding to complete the project. as with any large public infrastructure project, it is relying on public funding. in this case about 81% for the total construction cost. so financing is expected to come from unidentified private investment onc
mounted what's been described as a relentless months-long campaign akin to a defense at a trial. she marshalled all the data and the best arguments, and when decision day finally arrived, not only were two of the three maine facilities told to remain open, one of them was actually expanded. it's stories like this that help explain why olympia's constituents keep sending her back to washington by such wide, wide margins and why so many were shocked to hear that she would be leaving at the end of the year. as one shipyard worker in portsmouth whose job she helped save put it, we love her, we love her and she loves us. and i can't recall ever saying that publicly about a u.s. senator, the ship worker said, but truly she is a wonderful person. senator snowe will tell you many of her political views solidified during her modest maine upbringing. her parents ran a diner near augusta, and while they didn't have much, her father was adamant she receive a good education. so much so that he was dismayed to learn her kindergarten only lasted half the day. he was convinced, she once said, that i
have a nor'easter our defenses are so far down that person's immune system is susceptible and thirdly, we come with less than 30 days to the -- this just has to be done. i feel like i have to be houdini to accomplish this so we are going to do this and so, secretary at look forward to your work and your help as we get to our colleagues as well. thank you mr. chairman. >> i will note this senator menendez will chair a subcommittee field hearing in new jersey next monday december december 10 on super storm sandy. senator toomey. >> thank you mr. chairman and thank you mr. secretary for joining us. i would like to understand better and aspects of the actuarial review. the question arises from the interest-rate assumptions and the interest-rate interest rate environment that is used to determine the prevailing view about the value of the mutual mortgage insurance fund and the family fund. more specifically, you observe on page eight of your testimony the fact the worst shape the fund is to simplify that and you walk through the mechanisms by which a lower interest rates while good for the
in mali. what i heard from our experts, from the department of defense, from the state department, from usaid as well as a range of outside experts and one witness who testified from bamaco, the capital of mali, is was of concern to me. this is the largest controlled area in the world. in the north, extremists have imposed a harsh and strict version of sharia, or islamic law, and gross human rights violations. many people have heard of timbuktu but don't know it's a city in northern mali. in a site where extremists have behaved much like the taliban did in afghanistan before 9/11, destroying sacred and religious historic artifacts, imposing a harsh version of sharia that has meant amputations, stoning, violation of women's rights and free speech and religious free exercise rights, fundamentalling changing the tolerance and inclusive history of mali and creating with it a humanitarian crisis as more than 400,000 malians have fled, either internally displaced within mali or going to neighboring countries with refugees. with growing ties between these terrorists and nigeria, libya and thro
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17